First Continental Congress Facts

First Continental Congress Facts
The First Continental Congress took place between September 5th, 1774 and October 26th, 1774 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at Carpenter's Hall. It was a meeting between 12 of the 13 colonies' delegates, at an early stage of the American Revolution. The meeting took place because the British Parliament had passed the 'Coercive Acts' in response to the Boston Tea Party in Massachusetts. The only colony that did not send delegates was Georgia, who was looking for help from the British to deal with the problems they had with Native Americans. In total 56 delegates from 12 colonies attended.
Interesting First Continental Congress Facts:
During the meeting, discussions at the First Continental Congress involved how to deal with the possibility of their petition to halt the 'Coercive Acts' being rejected by the British.
Discussions at the First Continental Congress also involved calling a Second Continental Congress if the petition to halt the 'Coercive Acts' was rejected.
The 'Coercive Acts' were also referred to as the 'Intolerable Acts'.
Peyton Randolph presided over the First Continental Congress from September 5th, to October 21st, 1774, when Henry Middleton took over. Henry presided over the First Continental Congress from October 22nd to October 26th, 1774.
The Secretary to the First Continental Congress was Charles Thomson, the leader of Philadelphia's Committee of Correspondence.
Although delegates of 12 colonies attended, they did not all agree why they were there.
Conservative delegates believed they should be creating common policies to force an end to the British acts and reconcile with Britain. Radicals believed they needed to put an end to the abuses of British power. Some believed that the legislative power of British Parliament needed to come to an end.
The result of the First Continental Congress was to pass and sign the Continental Association in the Declaration and Resolves. The Continental Association called for a boycott of British goods, which would come into effect in December of that same year.
The first accomplishment of the First Continental Congress was a compact to boycott British goods, agreed to by the colonies. It was also agreed that if the acts were not repealed the colonies would cease to export to Britain as of September 10th, 1775.
The second accomplishment of the First Continental Congress was to ensure that a Second Continental Congress would take place on May 10th, 1775, which would not only include the colonies, but others by invitation. Those to be invited included Quebec, P.E.I. Nova Scotia, East and West Florida, and the only colony that did not attend the First Continental Congress - Georgia. It is believed that ultimately only invitations were sent to Quebec.
Delegates at the First Continental Congress included two from New Hampshire, four from Massachusetts, two from Rhode Island, three from Connecticut, nine from New York, five from New Jersey, eight from Pennsylvania, three from Delaware, five from Maryland, seven from Virginia, three from North Carolina, and five from South Carolina.
Delegates at the First Continental Congress included future United States Presidents George Washington (1st President) and John Adams (2nd President).


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