George Washington Carver Timeline
Timeline Description: George Washington Carver was one of the best-known African-Americans of the early 20th century. He believed it was important to develop practical farming methods to help poor farmers learn to be self-sufficient. He was interested in both art and science and became a prominent botanist and teacher.

Date Event
1864 George Washington Carver is born in Diamond Grove, Missouri.

George Washington Carver is born to the slave of Moses and Susan Carver. Soon after his birth, he and his mother are kidnapped. Carver is found and returned to Moses and Susan Carver. After emancipation, the Carvers kept George and his brother and raise them.
1890 George Washington Carver enrolls in Simpson College in Iowa.

Carver is the first black student admitted to the school and is allowed to enter without an official high school degree. George attends Simpson College to study piano and art. His art teacher is impressed by his ability with plants and encourages him to transfer to Iowa State College of Agriculture in Ames, Iowa.
1891 George Washington Carver transfers to Iowa State College of Agriculture.

Carver is the first black student to attend Iowa State College of Agriculture. He begins his study of plants. Three future U.S. secretaries of agriculture graduated from Iowa State College of Agriculture, including Professor James Wilson. Wilson is Carver's mentor.
1894 George Washington Carver earns his Bachelor's degree.

Carver receives a Bachelor of Agriculture Degree from Iowa State College of Agriculture. He is appointed as a faculty member there after graduation.
1896 George Washington Carver earns his Master of Agriculture Degree at Iowa State College of Agriculture.

Carver receives his master's degree from Iowa State College of Agriculture. Booker T. Washington asks Carver to lead an agriculture school at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.
1897 George Washington Carver is named director of the Agricultural Experiment Station at Tuskegee Institute.

Carver goes to Tuskegee Institute to direct the Agricultural Experiment Station. His goal is to help poor black farmers learn to grow more soil-enriching crops. Carver's early experiments are on sweet potatoes, peanuts, and soybeans.
1906 George Washington Carver creates the Jessup Agricultural Wagon.

Carver designs a horse-drawn vehicle, called the Jessup Agricultural Wagon, that allows him to do demonstrations of his experiments for farmers. Carver believes this is his most significant contribution to educating farmers.
1916 George Washington Carver is named a fellow for the London Royal Society for the Encouragement of the Arts.

Carver becomes an honorary member of the London Royal Society. Carver receives this award, which is rare for Americans.
1921 George Washington Carver testifies before the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee.

Carver testifies before the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee to support a tariff on imported peanuts. He shares his ideas for the many ways peanuts can be used.
1923 George Washington Carver receives the Spingarn Medal for Distinguished Service to Science.

The NAACP honors Carver with the Spingarn Medal for his work in advancing the black cause. The Spingarn Medal is awarded yearly by the NAACP for outstanding achievement by an African-Americans.
1928 Carver receives an honorary Doctorate of Science from Simpson College.

Carver received a honorary Doctorate of Science degree from Simpson College. In 2005, as part of the school's 150th anniversary, the school adds a scholarship and a fellowship in his name.
1935 Carver is appointed a collaborator with the United States Department of Agriculture.

Carver begins to work with the United States Department of Agriculture on the study of plant diseases. He will be inducted into the USDA Hall of Fame in 2000.
1940-1941 Carver establishes the George Washington Carver Research Foundation at Tuskegee.

Carver donates his life savings of $60,000 to the George Washington Carver Research Foundation at the Tuskegee Institute. The money is issued to provide opportunities for African Americans in the advanced studies of botany, chemistry, and agronomy.
July 14, 1943 The George Washington Carver National Monument is established at his birthplace in Missouri.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicates $30,000 for the George Washington Carver National Monument at the site of the plantation where Carver lived as a child. The complex includes a statue of Carver, a museum, a nature trail, and a cemetery. It is the first monument dedicated to an African-American.






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